The interim decision was to include in Schedule 4 and in Appendix D Item 5 Growth Hormone Releasing Hormones (GHRHs), Growth Hormone Secretagogues (GHSs), Growth Hormone Releasing Peptides (GHRPs) as well as new individual substance entries for CJC-1295, ipamorelin, pralmorelin (Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2), Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-6, hexarelin and AOD-9604.


Growth Hormone Releasing Peptides (GHRP) are a class of compounds, which stimulate the release of growth hormone. GHRP variants include GHRP-2, GHRP-6, hexarelin, ipamorelin (Thomas et al, 2011) and agents with similar actions including CJC-1295 (Teichman et al, 2006, Acherman et al, 1999, Walker et al, 2006). These agents are considered peptide hormones. GHRPs are thought to act by stimulating the release of endogenous human growth hormone leading to pharmacological effects such as increased bone mineral density, increased lean muscle mass, modest improvements in strength and improved recovery from injuries such as fractures (Smith, 2005).
Peptides can make the goal of growing bigger muscles possible. They may also help to burn body fat, improve muscle recovery and slow aging. Each type has specific purposes for which it is more useful. These compounds are in many cases beneficial because of how they boost release of growth hormone by the pituitary gland. GH secretion is amplified when GHRH and GHRP substances are used together. As awesome as the benefits they offer sound, you should remember that peptides can be legally used for research purpose only.
Growth hormone-releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) (developmental code name SKF-110679), also known as growth hormone-releasing hexapeptide, is one of several synthetic met-enkephalin analogues that include unnatural D-amino acids, were developed for their growth hormone-releasing activity and are called growth hormone secretagogues. They lack opioid activity but are potent stimulators of growth hormone (GH) release. These secretagogues are distinct from growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) in that they share no sequence relation and derive their function through activation of a completely different receptor. This receptor was originally called the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR), but due to subsequent discoveries, the hormone ghrelin is now considered the receptor's natural endogenous ligand, and it has been renamed as the ghrelin receptor. Therefore, these GHSR agonists act as synthetic ghrelin mimetics.
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